Black silk dress

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We have about 50 different deadstock/vintage fabrics in stock waiting to be turned into new creations. , you may find yourself walking around your favorite fabric shop without having a specific project or plan in mind. I found this vintage black silk fabric during a random visit to Max Bloch. love at first sight. Superb feel, soft to the touch, perfect glow when draped with movement. I thought it was time to make my first bias cut dress using hand sewing techniques.In the end the dress turned out to be a simple and effortless dress, but this was the most time consuming project.

Read on for more details 🙂

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Inspiration

pattern making

sewing

final look

Inspiration

The inspiration for this dress came from the master of everything, Madeline Vionnet. She was a revolutionary designer who invented the bias cutting technique. Although she was not known internationally, she had a great influence on the evolution of her fashion, paving the way for a modern, comfortable and feminine look that is still valid today.

pattern making

Bias cut stencil making is almost the same as regular stencils. I started with the basic foundation blocks and added modifications like the Empire Cut pattern. We left the waist of the pattern in neutral to check the drape on the mannequin first, then adjusted the pattern later to achieve the desired drape on the back. I decided to go for an A-line skirt with a little flare. Once all the pattern pieces were completed, I checked the pattern by trying it on a fabric similar to the original and made any necessary corrections to create the final pattern.

sewing

Silk is a delicate fabric, so it is important to follow the correct procedure and cut the pattern correctly. Before cutting the silk, place a large piece of paper on it and use pins to secure the fabric so that it does not shift during cutting. This is the most important step and you need to make sure the grain lines in the fabric are aligned correctly parallel to the straight edge of the paper. , make sure the grain lines are in the correct direction. Once you have pinned the corners of the fabric, fold it in half diagonally as shown in the photo below. Once the fabric is well placed, you can continue cutting pattern pieces with the bias of the fabric.

Moving on to the sewing part, this project took the longest to complete due to the intense hand sewing I had to do. Hand sew together to form the bodice. Once the double-layer bodice was complete, I moved on to the bottom piece. First, I basted the skirt pieces together. Next, sew the bodice and the skirt together. Since the dress is backless and has a low drape, I only needed a seam to connect the bodice to the skirt at the front of the dress. The fabric had already been hanging on the mannequin for several days at this point, so I was confident that the fabric had stretched enough to complete the side seams and hemline of the skirt.

After finishing everything, I decided that the slit was missing. I decided the position of the slit and improvised a way to hang the chain from the top of the slit and cut it straight. I followed the chain, which lay straight under gravity, and cut a slit. After hand-sewing the edges of the slit, I hand-sewn the inner seams for a neat finish.

final look

Enjoy your project!

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cheers,

all

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